Posted by: Liz Massey | May 16, 2011

Surf’s Up, Condensed: Top Creativity Links for May 16, 2011

Photo courtesy of SXC.

Innovation Myth: Ideas Spread Quickly | Innovation Leadership Network
Tim Kastelle provides a cogent explanation of how new ideas and technologies spread through a culture and why something that often looks like today’s trend may actually be something decades in the making.

Renewable Music: A wish list for neuroscientists from a musician
Composer Daniel Wolf provides an intriguing list of problems or mysteries related to music and the human brain that he’d like neuro researchers to unravel. Brain and music geeks will like the discussion in the comments that follow the post.

Taking it home, part 2: passion, permission and prototyping – d.school news
Tom Maiorana discusses three key take-aways from Stanford University’s “Design Thinking Bootcamp,” which is run by its Hasso Plattner Institute of Design, or d.school. The bootcamp focuses on how to transform companies by applying design thinking in their everyday work processes.

The agony of creative blocks and how to remove them | Escape From Cubicle Nation
Pam Slim relates the details of a low-productivity day she had and shares an interview she recorded with Steven Pressfield, author of The War of Art and the new book Do the Work. Pressfield’s new book directly addresses resistance, and discusses how to move through it to accomplish what you want to accomplish.

10 Young Female Composers You Should Know
This post on Flavorwire highlights 10 women drawn from a list of 100 composers under 40 compiled via an NPR listener poll. Musicians include Lera Auerbach, Ann Cleare, Missy Mazzoli and Rachel Grimes. Each woman profiled has her work showcased in a video clip.

Shadows Bright As Glass: When Brain Injuries Transform Into Art
Jon Sarkin was working as a chiropractor when he suffered a massive stroke. Afterwards, the 35-year-old became a volatile visual artist with a ferocious need to create, as his brain tried to make sense of the world at large. This is an NPR report on his life.

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